Urban Habitats for Native Bees

Ecological Restoration cover
The cover for ER featured native bees of KCMO. Photo by Matt Kelly. 

I’m happy to report that my article on native bees in urban habitats is now available in this month’s issue of Ecological RestorationBased on work completed with my Honors Biology student Laura Presler for her capstone project at Avila University, the paper provides evidence for the important role of small remnant habitats in conserving native bees.

We were especially honored to have the paper featured on the cover of the journal with a beautiful photo by Matt Kelly of the brown-belted bumblebee (Bombus griseocollis) and a green sweat bee (Augochlorini) on the flower Dalea purpurea.

This is the first of what I hope will be a series of papers based on ongoing efforts to monitor and understand the native bee community of the Greater Kansas City Area, and to apply this understanding to the larger question of how best to support native bees in urban landscapes. Many thanks to my colleagues at Bridging the Gap/Kansas City Wildlands, Kansas City Parks and Recreation, and the Missouri Department of Conservation for collaborating in this work.

Speaking of Matt Kelly, I want to give a shout out to his latest Bee Report Podcast. The third episode was released this week and features Dr. Hollis Woodard of the University of California, Riverside. Dr. Woodard is organizing a National Native Bee Monitoring Network, a nation-wide effort to monitor native bees. My lab will be participate in this effort through our work in the Kansas City area. To find out more about the network and why it’s important, please visit The Bee Report. And while you’re at it, listen to their other podcasts, too! You will find a lot of interesting and engaging information about native bee research and conservation.

Those are my updates for now. Spring seems to be getting an early start in the Midwest, so we will be starting the 2020 field season soon!

 

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